Should You Eat More Cranberries During the Holiday Season?

George H.W. Bush, former president and known for his hatred of broccoli might be pleased to note that he can get many more antioxidants by eating cranberries than by eating broccoli. Additionally, cranberries are said to ward off bladder and urinary tract infection. The tart and tangy flavor of cranberries makes them a unique treat especially during Thanksgiving and the holiday season. One of North America’s only native fruit is being recognized for its versatility, convenience and powerful nutritional benefits.

Recently, researchers from Rutgers University showed the ability of cranberry juice cocktail to disable E. coli bacteria responsible for urinary tract infection– even some persistent types known to be resistant to antibiotics. Cranberry has also been linked to a reduction in the risk of gum disease and stomach ulcers. Animal studies have shown that cranberries decrease levels of total LDL cholesterol.

Cranberries rank as one of the best sources of valuable antioxidants, such as flavonoids. USDA declared the month of October as National Cranberry Month. In today’s fast moving scientific world of rapid discoveries concerning the virtues of the boundless fruits and vegetables available, the only way a seasonal such as cranberry can distinguish itself is by proving its nutritional value.